Skip to main content

Full text of "The beamer : Bradford Durfee Textile School yearbook"

See other formats


1 ;;•• 

• • • m _ • 




>NjW!»rK» __±^z=s=2^> 



• • • • • **• * • • ' 



• • • 

• ••• 










••< 



'•'•J 

•••r 




BRADFORD DURFEE 



TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



FALL RIVER ♦ MASSACHUSETTS 








The students of the Class of 1951, particularly those 
of the Textile Division, hold a special interest for me. 
They should be congratulated on their achievements. 
They have wisely improved the present and their 
future accomplishments will depend on their ability to 
adapt the knowledge they have acquired. It is vitally 
important to have a progressive education and to keep 
it well-balanced. The character of the individual will 
have a definite bearing on his success in life. 

This being a new era, for the Institute, insofar as 
its collegiate standing is concerned, it would seem fitting 
for this class to be the pioneer in the establishment of 
a stronger and better alumni association which would 
be very valuable to the student body as a whole and 
would increase in value as the years go by. 




cr-^^ 




Since 1929, every graduating class of every edu- 
cational institution in the United States has been told 
at commencement that it faces an uncertain, trouble- 
some future. The prophecies proved too true. Depres- 
sion, political turmoil, and war have invaded the lives 
of all Americans. The remarkable fact about this period 
of American history, however, has not been the correct- 
ness of the commencement prophets, but rather the 
toughness, adaptability and resourcefulness of the 
American citizen. 

The members of the Class of 1951, whose four 
years of peaceful, constructive, academic achievement 
have been parenthesized by war, face an uncertain 
troubled future. They are equal to it. * 





PRESIDENT LESLIE B. COOMBS 



DR. D. ALEXANDER SEVERINO 

B.S., Ed. M., Ed. D. 
Professor and Chairman of the 

Art and Product Development 

Department 



DR. JAMES WATTERS 
B.S. M.S. Sc.D. 
Professor and Chairman of the 
Chemistry Department 





JOHN G. STICKLER 
Associate Professor and Chair- 
man of the Textile Department 



FRANK H. DILLON, B.S. 
Associate Professor and Chair- 
man of the Engineering De- 
partment 





* ■ ' " " " 




ROBERT E. COOPER 

Instructor in Weaving and 

Physical Testing 



LOUIS S. J. SIMEONE. B.S. 
Instructor in Mathematics 




KENNETH C. TEDFORD. B.F.A. 

Instructor in Art and Product 

Development 



JOHN W. FERGUSON 

Instructor in Carding and 

Spinning 



RUDOLPH L. LA VAULT, 
Ed.B. Ed.M. 

Associate Professor in 
Social Sciences 



JOHN J. CRAWFORD 
Instructor in Machine Shop 




FREDERICK WINTER 

A.B. M.A. 
Instructor in English 



WALTER E. MARSTON 
Instructor in Chemistry 



WILLIAM H. WINGATE 

Instructor in Dyeing and 

Finishing 



BERTRAM B. HARDY, B.S. 

Instructor in Electrical 

Engineering 



IllliPlfS^ 



STOWrfWi :c<tM 




3LAUDE W. WAGNER 

B.S. M.S. 

Instructor in Chemistry 



ALBERT A. STEWART B.S. 
Instructor in Engineering 



SAMUEL A. STONE M.S. 
Instructor in Mathematics 



:s 



EUGENE ROBIE WILLIAMS 

B.S. 

Instructor in Engineering 



JOHN GREENHALGH 

Instructor in Art and Product 

Development 




WALTER J. CASS A.B. M.A. 

Instructor in English and 

German 



JOHN W. NORMAN 

Associate Professor of Weaving 

and Warp Preparation 













Ik* 








\ 9" --. 


w 




^^^k 


l (« 








\ ^ 






Ws^ 


^1 lT4i 








HAROLD C. SMITH 

Associate Professor of Carding 

and Spinning 




MISS JACQUELINE P. URBAN 
Senior Bookeeper 



MISS MARGARET E. MORGAN 
Accountant and Treasurer 



MISS FIDELIA D. DA VOL 
A.B. M.S. 
Clerk-Stenographer 







Editor-in-Chief 
HARRY B. MARTIN 






JACK MOSS 
Photography Manager 



CRITON D. SPILIOTIS 
Art Manager 





ROBERT A. SMTTH 
Business Manager 



RUSSELL A. 
CONSTANTINE 

Activities Manager 




ALETHEA STAFF 



EDITOR - IN - CHIEF 
Harry B. Martin 



ART MANAGER 
Criton D. Spiliotis 

ASSISTANT ART MANAGER 
John F. Silvia, Jr. 

ART ASSISTANTS 

Arthur Soares 

Thomas F. Kenney, Jr. 

Donald F. Benoit 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Robert A. Smith 

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER 
Donald F. Farrell 

BUSINESS ASSISTANTS 

Laurence F. Root 

William F. Moran 

John P. Monis 

Leonard F. Campbell 

Frederick J. Lamoureux 

Henry S. Walker 

Joseph Iamarone 

Robert A. Staples 



PHOTOGRAPHY MANAGER 
Jack Moss 

ASST. PHOTOGRAPHY MANAGER 
Lynwood I. Gibson 

PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANTS 

Henry Ziemba 

Jack Stavroudis 

ACTIVITIES MANAGER 
Russell C. Constantine 

ASST. ACTIVITIES MANAGER 
John R. Hinves 

ACTIVITIES ASSISTANTS 

Joseph H. McKenna 

Raymond Roy 

Henry S. Yatsko 

Edward Cowell 

William C. Buckley 

Norman M. Simmons 

Gerald G. Schnabel 



EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES 
Omer L. Bergeron, Robert F. Rodman, Dana Binkoff. 



EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 
Robert A. Gauthier, Leo J. Langfield, Roger E. Larrivee, Harold J. Peterson, 
Alfred J. Slowe, Paul H. Terry, Stanley V. Dubiel, Jr., Alexander Smith, Neil 
Murphy, Ann Doherty, Paul Parente, Edward F. Levell, Edward Grota, Lester 
Raymond, Morris Cohen, John L. Keenan. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The publication of the many individual and collective contributions that are a part oi a 
yearbook such as THE ALETHEA, commands the appreciation and gratitude oi the editors to all 
who assisted in its consummation. We sincerely thank: 

The efficient and zealous staff of THE ALETHEA, who worked on the preparation, ad-seeking, 
layout, writing, editing, and proofreading of every page. 

Mr. Walter J. Cass our literary advisor who contributed much perseverance and time in the 
preparation and editing of THE ALETHEA and was always ready and willing to assist with the 
many problems that confronted us. 

Mr. Kenneth C. Tedford our art advisor, whose decisions, suggestions and advice regarding 
our layout, photography, and art work vitally affected the inspired appearance of this yearbook. 

Professor John Stickler who encouraged us with much good counsel on how to get around. 

Mr. Eugene R. Williams, Mr. Frederick Winter, and Mr. Louis S. Simeone all of whom assisted 
in the preparation of material. 

Mr. Samuel A. Stone and the College Bookstore who provided us with an efficient means of 
distributing THE ALEJHEA. 

Miss Helen Allaid of Petrie Studios who contributed much pleasant advice on the choice of 
photographs. 

Miss Fidelia D. Davol, Miss Margaret E. Morgan, and Miss Jacgueline P. Urban who kindly 
supplied information and help whenever reguired. 

Mr. Jack Brown of O'Toole & Sons whose technical information and experience and patience 
were relied upon countless times during the planning and publication of THE ALETHEA. 

The faculty of B. D. T. I. for their kind tolerance of the many class interruptions so that we 
might take pictures. 

Our advertisers who so substantially contributed to the success of this yearbook. Please give 
them your consideration whenever the opportunity arises. 




We started our college careers in September 1947 as the largest freshman 
class ever to enter the Bradford Durfee Technical Institute. We numbered 
some hundred and twenty students at that time but the years that followed 
considerably thinned our ranks. On registration day President Leslie B. Coombs 
spoke in the auditorium and told us of the curriculum changes which four 
years later enabled us to culminate our courses with Bachelor of Science 
degrees. 

That first year at Tech taught us many things not included in the curric- 
ulum. The idea of cramming for exams caught on very well with those who 
never seemed to have the time to open a book. During free periods many of 
us ran to the "Greasy Spoon" for a cup of coffee and a special group of 
future engineering majors who were part of "the best class 'Professor' Simeone 
ever taught", went to the Bijou to relax and talk about their Army experiences. 
We soon became aware of the many foreign and out-of-town students with 
us at the Institute. And co-eds also! 

It seemed as though we were having a wonderful time at a country club 
until midyear examination time rolled around. Burning the midnight oil and 
then rising early to study again, never made for healthful living, but we wanted 
to stay at Tech for the second half of our freshman year. The marks came 
from the front office. A few names were on the Dean's List, a few were gone 
completely, but the majority of us were going to be all right. Subjects didn't 
get easier the second semester. Mr. Simone's College Algebra became Trigo- 
nometry and Analytical Geometry; and Mr. Winters' WOGAPPER, something 
we remember to this day, was transformed into Public Speaking. There were 
fraternities at Tech, and while some of us pledged for Phi Psi, another group 
became charter members of the new Epsilon Phi Pi fraternity. 

After final examinations were concluded we rushed off to worry about 
marks and summer jobs. 




Depleted in numbers but inflated in spirit, we resumed our studies in 
September 1948 determined to show our instructors that we had caught on to 
the routine and would be able to take college work in stride. The situation had 
changed however, and we were now into the meat or our major courses. The 
textile men warily ventured into the labyrinth of machinery known as the 
"annex"; the engineers moved into Professor Dillon's office; and the chemists 
set up housekeeping in the third floor labs and in the new dye house. We lost 
some men and all but one of our co-eds to the newly created Art and Product 
Development department. It was courageous Marie Hurley who elected to stick 
it out as a textile engineer. 

The fraternities began their rushing for pledges and in a spirit of revelry, 
the Cosmopolitan Club traveled up to Boston for dinner on a Wednesday and 
managed to arrive back in Fall River the following morning just in time for 
8:30 classes. The DISTAFF published its first, last, and only eight page issue 
and the civils, mechanicals, and electricals got together to form the Engineering 
Society. The baseball team went through a standard season and we ended 
the year in a blaze of examinations. 

Numerous changes had taken place at Tech by the time we returned for 
the fall of 1949. A college Bookstore had opened on the second floor and it 
soon became a popular gathering place for students — most of whom were 
hoping to find it open. A cafeteria was installed in the lounge on the basement 
floor. The cafeteria guickly became a meeting place for those of us who were 
cutting classes and had the price of a cup of coffee. 

Whether in class or out, we felt right at home at Tech in our junior year. 
The chemists, when they weren't pushing their way through German trans- 
lations for Mr. Cass, were dyeing "strings" for "Rapid Willie" Wingate. All 
our engineers, including textile students were busy composing lengthy elec- 
tricity lab reports for Mr. Hardy. Marie Hurley was doing wonderfully in her 
third year as a textile engineer and Chris Spiliotis became the student who 
gave Tech a much needed campus seal. 

In September 1950 we came back to Tech for the last time. Quite a few 
of us had become family men by that time and those who were married — 
some of us proud papas too — looked on in pleasant amusement as our class- 
mates took unto themselves wives. 

We seniors met and made plans for our final year. Bob Staples was 
elected president of the class; Eddie Cowell was elected vice-president, and 
Al Slowe and Bob Hinves were elected secretary and treasurer respectively. 

The American Association of Textile Chemist and Colorists held its 29th 
annual convention in Portsmouth, New Hampshire and a large contingent of 
seniors had a rip-roaring time motoring up with the Durfee Tech exhibits. The 
fraternities got together to sponsor a successful Freshman Hop with more 
seniors in attendance than freshmen. A few engineers had enough free time 
to take Mr. Simeone's History of Mathematics elective. A "75 mile or better" 
club was formed among the soccer players when car breakdowns stranded 
them in New Hampshire and again in Lowell, Mass. Intrepid Marie Hurley 
continued on undaunted with the textile engineers. She was helpful in keeping 
the boys in line on the field trip to Gosnold Mills. 

In our last semester at Tech, Mr. Cass offered a Principles of Job Seeking 
elective and future employment was all we had on our minds. Personnel men 
came to the Institute and interviewed us for positions and despite our appre- 
hension it appeared that everything was going to turn out all right. 

We graduated from Durfee Tech on June 4, 1951. 



RICHARD PAUL BARBER 

20 PRESBY AVE. TAUNTON, MASS. 

B.S. in Chemistry 

Dean's List 1; Earle P. Charlton, Jr. 
Scholarship 3; New England Textile 
Foundation Scholarship 4; Epsilon 
Phi Pi 3, 4; A. C. S. 3, 4; Bowling 
League 2, 3, 4; DISTAFF 1, 2, 3, 
Associate Editor 4; A.A.T.C.C. 1, 2, 
3, 4, Secretary 2, 3; Senior Calendar 
4. 



FRANCIS J. BEAULIEU 

49 BAY ST. TAUNTON, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 
Phi Psi 3, 4. 



WILLIAM C. BUCKLEY 

651 SOUTH ALMOND STREET, 

FALL RrVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4. 



LEONARD F. CAMPBELL 

786 WALNUT STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Soccer Manager 4; Varsity Club 4; 
Bowling League 3. 



10 





JOHN C. CHAKALOS 

137 MILTON STREET, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Phi Psi 3, 4. 



MORRIS COHEN 

1907 - 60TH STREET, 

BROOKLYN 4, NEW YORK 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; New England Tex- 
tile Foundation Scholarship 4; Epsilon 
Phi Pi 2, Treasurer 3, Chancellor 4; 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 
4; Bowling League 4. 



RUSSELL C. CONSTANTINE 

5 BYRON STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 
3, 4; ALETHEA, Activities Manager 
4; Engineering Society 2, 3, 4. 



WILLIAM GILL CORNER 

669 MIDDLE STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Dean's List 4; Phi Psi 4; Tennis Team 
2, 3, 4. 



n 



EDWARD COWELL 

275 MIDDLE STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Berkshire Scholarship 
3, 4; ALETHEA 4; Senior Class Vice- 
President; lunior Class President. 



RAYMOND B. DAVIS 

FLINT ST. FALL RIVER. MASS. 
B.S. in Civil Engineering 
Engineering Society 3, 4. 



STANLEY V. DUBIEL, JR. 

54 CONANT STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Chemistry 

New England Textile Foundation 
Scholarship 4; Earle P. Charlton Ir. 
Scholarship 3; Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4; Book- 
store Assistant 4; Placement Commit- 
tee 4; A.C.S., Secretary-Treasurer 3, 
Chairman 4; DISTAFF 2, 3; Bowling 
League 2, 3; A.A.T.C.C. 1, 2. 



RICHARD F. EATON 

1766 HIGHLAND AVE., 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Phi Psi 1, 2. 3, 4. 



12 





DONALD F. FARRELL 

878 SECOND STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

ALETHEA 4; Engineering Society 2, 
3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 4. 



CONRAD J. GAGNON 

212 NELSON STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 4; Earle P. Charlton Jr. 
Scholarship 2, 3; Phi Psi I, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 2; Engineering Society 3, 
4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2; 
Basketball 1. 



ROBERTA. GAUTHIER 

1192 SOUTH MAIN STREET, 

FALL RF7ER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Berkshire Scholarship 1, 2, 3, 4; Ep- 
silon Phi Pi 3, Treasurer 4; ALETHEA 
4; Basketball 2, Assistant Manager 3, 
Manager 4; Bowling League 3, 4; 
Baseball 1, 2. 



LYNWOOD I. GIBSON 

1344 BEDFORD STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Chemistry and Dyeing 

Dean's List 1, Phi Psi 1, 2, Junior War- 
den 3, President 4; ALETHEA 4; Sen- 
ior Publicity 4; A.A.T.C.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
President Sophomore Class; DISTAFF 
1, Sports Editor 2. 



13 



n^mmmiiimimim 



ERNEST A. GOLEC 

12 E. HOOSAS STREET, 

ADAMS. MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Berkshire Scholarship 1, 2, 3, 4; Ep- 
silon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2, 
Pledgemaster 3; DISTAFF, Alumni 
Editor 2; Cosmopolitan Club 2; Bas- 
ketball, Assistant Manager 2. 



MILTON M. GOSS, JR. 

87 READ STREET, 

FALL RIVER. MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Phi Psi 2, 3, 4. 



JOSEPH F. HENRY 

16 HOME STREET. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



u 



JOHN ROBERT HINVES 

728 WEETAMOE STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Treasurer 2, 3; Senior Class Treasur- 
er; Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Bow- 
ling League 2. 





MARIE THERESA HURLEY 

202 RIDGE STREET, 

FALL RIVER MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Kappa Sigma Phi 3, 4; Social Com- 
mittee 4; DISTAFF 3. 



JOSEPH A. IAMARONE 

65 BEATTIE STREET. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

Earle P. Charlton Scholarship 3, 4; 
Epsilon Phi Pi 3, 4; Engineering So- 
ciety 2, 3, 4; Bowling League 2. 



JOHN L. KEENAN 

21 CARON STREET, 

SOUTHBRIDGE, MASS. 

B.S. in Chemistry and Dyeing 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4, Chancellor 2; 
Commencement Committee 4; Cos- 
mopolitan Club 2, 3, 4; A.A.T.C.C. 2, 
3, President 4; A.C.S. 4; Bowling 
League 2, 3, 4. 



AUNG KIN 



113 PAGODA ROAD, 

RANGOON, BURMA 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Cosmopolitan Club 2, Treasurer 3, 4; 
Soccer Team 4; A.A.T.C.C. 2, 3, 4. 



15 



FREDERIC J. LAMOUREUX 

1319 NORTH MAIN STREET. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

ALETHEA 4; Varsity Club 1, 2. 3, 4; 
Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; DISTAFF 
1, 2; Soccer 1. 



LEO J. LANGFIELD 

174 CORY STREET. 

FALL RIVER. MASS. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2. 3. 4; ALETHEA 4; 
Engineering Society 2, 3, President 4. 



WILBERT G. LANGFIELD 

280 HORTONVILLE ROAD. 

SWANSEA. MASS. 

B.S. Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2. 3. 4; Frank S. Stev- 
ens Scholarship 2, 3; Engineering 
Society 2, 3, 4; Student Assistant 4; 
Bowling League 2. 



ROGER E. LARRIVEE 

916 BROADWAY. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

Dean's List 3; Epsilon Phi Pi 3, 4; 
ALETHEA 4; Baseball 1, 2. 3. 4; Var- 
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treas- 
urer 3; Engineering Society 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2. 



16 





ROBERT J. LeBRUN 

43 COTTAGE STREET, 

TAUNTON, MASS. 

B.S. in Chemistry and Dyeing 

Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, Scribe 4; A.A.T. 
C.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; A.C.S. 2, 3, 4; Bowling 
League 2, 3, Treasurer 4; Senior So- 
cial Committee, Chairman; Varsity 
Club 3, 4; Baseball 2. 3. 



ROBERT H. MADOWSKY 

230 GIFFORD AVE., 

SOMERSET, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Deans List 2, 3, 4; James Tansey 
Scholarship 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 
4, Scribe 3; Varsity Club 3, 4; Bow- 
ling League 4; DISTAFF 2, Alumni 
Editor 3, 4; Baseball Manager 1, 2. 



RICHARD C. MANN 

680 HOOP STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Bowling 
League 2. 



HARRY B. MARTIN 

1220 SHAKESPEARE AVE., 

NEW YORK 52, NEW YORK 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; ALETHEA, 
Editor-in-Chief 4; DISTAFF 1, 2, As- 
sistant Editor 3, Editor - in - Chief 4; 
Bookstore Assistant 3, 4; A.A.T.C.C. 
4: Cosmopolitan Club 2, 3, 4. 



17 



JOSEPH H. McKENNA 

3 ASH STREET. 

JEWETT CITY, CONN. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Deans List 3, 4; New England Textile 
Foundation Scholarship 3, 4; Epsilon 
Phi Psi 1, 2, 3. 4, Chancellor 3; Varsity 
Club 2, 3, 4; Bowling League 4; A.A. 
T.C.C. 4; Athletic Association, Vice- 
President 3; Baseball 2. 



JOHN P. MONIS 

3966 NORTH MAIN STREET, 

FALL RrVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

Earl P. Charlton Jr. Scholarship 1; 
ALETHEA 4; Engineering Society 2, 
3, 4; Soccer 1, 2; DISTAFF 1, Asso- 
ciate Editor 2; Epsilon Phi Pi 4. 



WILLIAM F. MORAN 

104 LOCUST STREET, 

FALL RIVER. MASS. 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

Epsilon Phi Pi 3, Vice-Chancellor 4; 
ALETHEA 4; Engineering Society 2, 
3, 4; Baseball, Assistant Manager 3; 
Social Committee 1, Dean's List 4. 



18 



JACK MOSS 

47 CHAVENSON STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Dyeing and Finishing 

Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4; ALETHEA, 
Photography Manager 4; A.C.S. 3, 4, 
President 3; Fencing Team 3, Co-Cap- 
tain 4. A.A.T.C.C. 1, 2, 3, 4. 





JOSEPH THOMAS NOWAK 

514 SLADE STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Deans List 3; New England Textile 
Foundation Scholarship 4; Phi Psi 2, 
3, 4; Sophomore Class Vice-President. 



ROBERT H. O'KEEFE 

355 ROCHESTER STREET, 

FALL RrVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

Engineering Society 2, 3, 4; Bowling 
League 2. 



HAROLD J. PETERSON, JR. 

"Gunda" 

547 CENTRE ST., 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

ALETHEA 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, Co- 
Captain 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, Vice- 
President 3, President 4; Cosmopoli- 
tan Club 2, 3, 4; Soccer Team 1, 2, 3. 



C. CHARLES RENDINO 

17 PALMER STREET. 

ARLINGTON, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Cosmopolitan Club 2, 3, 4; Fencing 
Team 3, 4; Bowling League 2, 3; So- 
cial Committee, Chairman 1. 



19 



LAWRENCE F. ROOT 

177 SUNSET HILL, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

ALETHEA 4; Engineering Society 2, 
3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 4. 



RAYMOND J. ROY 

68 BARNES STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

Dean's List 1; Earle P. Charlton Jr. 
Scholarship 4; Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4; ALE- 
THEA 4, Placement Committee 4; 
Engineering Society 2, 3, 4. 



GERALD G. SCHNABEL 

2515 GLENWOOD RD., 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, Historian 4; 
ALETHEA 4; Bowling League 3, 4; 
Cosmopolitan Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



NORMAN M. SIMMONS 

432 DURFEE STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

Earle P. Charlton Jr. Scholarship 1; 
Engineering Society 2, 3, 4. 



20 





ALFRED J. SLOWE 

776 BEDFORD STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; Berkshire Schol- 
arship 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi Psi 1, Secretary 
2, 3, 4; ALETHEA 4; DISTAFF 4; Var- 
sity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 3, 
4; A.A.T.C.C. 3, 4; Representative 
Athletic and Social Union 1, 2; Bowl- 
ing League 3; Basketball 1. 



ALEXANDER SMITH 

135 BOWEN STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 1; Presi- 
dent Athletic Association 4; Varsity 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Basketball 
1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 4; Soccer Team 4. 



ROBERT A. SMITH 

225 JEPSON STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Civil Engineering 

Deans List 1, 2, 3, 4; Epsilon Phi Pi 
3, 4; ALETHEA, Business Manager 4; 
Engineering Society 2, 3, 4. 



MONIR T. SPAHI 

557 FOUAD 1ST AVE., 

ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

A.A.T.C.C. 2, 3, 4; Tennis 2, 3, 4; 
Fencing 4; Cosmopolitan Club 2, 3, 
Secretary 4. 



21 



CRITON D. SPILIOTIS 

8 AMALIAS STREET, 

THESSALONIKI, GREECE 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4; ALETHEA 
Art Manager 4; DISTAFF, Circulation 
Manager 3, 4; Cosmopolitan Club 1, 
Secretary 2, President 3, 4; Soccer 4, 
Varsity Club 4; Basketball Manager 
4. 



ROBERT EDWARD STAPLES 

301 HIGH STREET. 

SOMERSET, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; New England 
Textile Foundation Scholarship 3, 4; 
Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Senior 
Class President; Junior Class Treas- 
urer. 



ATHANASIOS PHOTIOS 

STAVROUDIS 

#6 IPSILANTOU STREET, 

THESSALONIKI, GREECE 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Cosmopolitan Club 2, 3, 4; Soccer 
Team 4; Fencing 3. 



EDWARD STRAUSS 

1715 NELSON AVE., 

BRONX 52, NEW YORK 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Epsilon Phi Pi 1, 2, 3, 4. 



22 





PAUL H. TERRY 

SOMERSET AVENUE, 

SEGREGANSETT, MASS. 

B.S. in Chemistry 

Dean's List 1, 2, 3, 4; New England 
Textile Foundation Scholarship 4; 
Earle P. Carlton Jr. Scholarship 1, 2, 
3; Phi Psi 2, 3, 4; A.A.T.C.C. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
A.C.S. 3, Vice-Chairman 4; DISTAFF 
1, 2, 3, 4; Bowling League 2, 3, 4; 
Laboratory Assistant 3. 



ERNEST J. VIGEANT 

52 BOGLE STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Tennis 2, 3, Captain 4; Bowling 
League 3, 4; Basketball 2; Baseball 
1,2. 



HENRY WALKER 

56 HAFFARDS STREET, 

FALL RrVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Epsilon Phi Pi 3, 4; Tennis 2, 3. 



THEODORE WILLIAMSON, JR. 

903 PROSPECT ST., 

SOMERSET, MASS. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Dean's List 2, 3, 4; New England Tex- 
tile Foundation Scholarship 4; Phi Psi 
2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 4; Var- 
sity Club 2, 3, 4; Junior Class Vice- 
President. 



23 



SIDNEY WOLIN 

144 GROVE STREET, 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 

B.S. in Chemistry and Dyeing 

A.A.T.C.C. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



HENRY STEPHEN YATSKO 

279 E. GRAND STREET, 

NANTICOKE, PENNA. 

B.S. in Textile Engineering 

Dean's List 3, 4; Phi Psi 1, 2, 3, 4; 
ALETHEA 4; Social Committee 4; 
DISTAFF 3, 4. 



HENRY G. ZIEMBA 

58 BROWN AVE., 

JEWETT CITY, CONN. 

B.S. in Chemistry and Dyeing 

Epsilon Phi Pi 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; 
A.A.T.C.C. 2, 3, 4; A.C.S. 4; Cosmo- 
politan Club 3, Vice-President 4; 
Baseball Manager 3; Varsity Club 4; 
Bowling League 2, 3, President 4; 
Scab-in-Lab. 1, 2, 3, 4. 




24 




HmSBSRSZ 










Our junior year started with a bang. Elections were held as usual and 
Louis Fayan was elected President. Other officers elected were Roger Bridge 
and Neil Murphy as Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer, respectively. 

What the future holds in store for the class of 1952 is yet to be seen, but 
because of the ability of our classmates we are confident that we will uphold 
the high tradition of Bradford Durfee Technical Institute. 



~ it* 







f^ 






^ 



i 



r - ' J 








^ 







i 





j 




la ^ F 



Utntt 

mm 

m 

Mills: 






d 





\ 




J* 




^^^ 

& ^^^ 



x.i 



r>ao 







^ 





JW 




^ 



\ 







^ o ^ 



-u\ 





i 



/ 





















gp«a 

tut »!£:•.• *.th 



■ m\ m il 1 fl Ifeii l\ 




k7 




*^' *5 












<kJV. fcJ 




f^ 

* %>*.. 



/ -♦• 







In September, 1949, a group of scared but eager freshmen entered the 
halls of Durfee Tech for the first time and soon found that scholastic life here 
was far different from that of high school. In general, there was little time for 
participation in the activities and social gatherings which were held during 
the year. Yet, from our Freshman Class came the Gamma Chapter of the 
Kappa Sigma Phi Sorority, the first Sorority at Tech. Among the eight charter 
members were Ruth Loub, Myrbeth Weldon, Joan Seifert and Ruth Rockcliffe, 
all members of our class. Ruth Loub and Myrbeth Weldon were elected to the 
office of Treasurer and Vice-President respectively. In the course of their activ- 
ities, our freshman girls formed a cheering squad to spur the teams on. 

Working our way through the engulfing tides of finals we emerged tired 
but happy knowing that for the present the worst was over. 

Our history is still in the making. Although the threatening clouds of war 
hover above us, we are continuing on. The prospect of leaving a job only half 
done leaves us disheartened but not discouraged. If there is no alternative but 
to leave, then perhaps someday when the world is at peace we can return and 
take up our studies again. 




■•mtir mm 

ZL mmEmmm 



■riiUVrii 





s 





Class began on September 18 for all freshmen. This was an eventful 
occasion, for on this day we met our instructors for the first time. We soon 
realized that the task of earning a degree was one not for a haphazard worker, 
but only for an earnest student. After a few days had passed, we were ad- 
justed to the college routine, and hard study was the rule. 

On November 15, class elections were held under the supervision of our 
faculty advisors, Mr. Tedford and Mr. Stewart, with the following results: 
President, Richard White; Vice-President, Paul Parente; Secretary, Dorothy 
Zebrasky; Treasurer, Stanley Sieczkowski. 

In athletics, freshmen made their influence felt from the start. During the 
soccer season, two booters, William Jackson and Paul Parente, contributed their 
best sportsmanship to the not-very-successful team; later each boy was award- 
ed the coveted letter. At the basketball tryouts, bright prospects boomed when 
three of our classmates — George McGaw, Joseph Gardella, and Dean Crook 
— became members of the varsity sguad, and several others made the junior 
varsity. 

Social events have been a welcome addition to our college life. In the fall 
the very successful Freshman Hop was held at Eagles Hall, and later we en- 
joyed the Christmas Dance at Stevenson's. The social climax came with the 
Christmas Assembly in which freshmen contributed their share of the enter- 
tainment, including participation in skits. 

The resumption of classes after New Year's signified the return of students 
to hard work before the mid-year examinations. 

Those of us who survived are looking with anxiety to the uncertain future 
that faces us in the present war crisis. We will try to gain all the education we 
can, for we realize that with this advantage we shall be more valuable to our 
country whether we remain civilians or become members of the armed forces. 







Jkt* • 1 













STUDENT ACTIVITIES 





BASKETBALL 



The 1950-51 Basketball team played the toughest schedule that any Tech 
five had to face. Our hoopsters found the going rough and were able to win 
only four games while dropping fifteen. 

Included among the returning veterans were Co-Captains Alex Smith and 
Harold Peterson, Murray Cohen, Neil Murphy, Bill O'Neil, and Jack Wachs- 
berger. The varsity squad was bolstered by George McGaw, Joe Gardella, and 
Dean Crook, all up and coming freshmen. 

Of the four victories, three were gained in conference play. The most 
outstanding win of the year was scored against Stonehill College in a 62-61 
overtime thriller. This victory, coming early in the season proved to be the 
determining factor in preventing Stonehill from again taking the Southern 
New England Coastal Conference crown. This game was the second conference 
win for Tech and at the time raised hopes of another possible conference 
championship for Tech. However, the team's determination and drive was 
never again recaptured and despite its best efforts the remainder of the season 
proved very dissappointing. 

The '50-'51 season marked initial competition with Becker College at 
Worcester, Mass., and a re-schedule with Hillyer College of Hartford, Conn., 
after a three year lapse. The teams also made trips to Newport and Providence, 
Rhode Island, Bridgeport, Conn., and New Bedford, Lowell, North Easton, and 
Boston, Mass. 





^ 




o 



Our 1951 Tennis Team, with only two regulars lost to graduation 
last year and with a crew of eager newcomers, should have another 
good season. The schedule will be rough, but Mr. Greenhalgh's boys, 
we are sure, will prove a credit to the college. Ernie Vigeant, who 
won the championship at the Edgewood Junior College Invitation 
Tournament in May, 1950, is expected to be our outstanding star. 

Captain: Ernest J. Vigeant 
Secretary: Menelaos Yankopoulos 
Coach: John Greenhalgh 



ROSTER 



Norman Weinstein, Monir Spahi, Bill Corner, Jack 
Steinberg, Hank Walker, Henry N. Reis. 




The 1951 Bowling League was composed of eight teams includ- 
ing one made up entirely of girls. The individual scoring stars of 
the season were Bob Gauthier and Marie Hurley. John Keenan 
starred at the annual banquet. The "Engineers" were the team 
champs. 

Officers: President — Henry Ziemba 
Treasurer — Bob Le Brun 
Secretary — Ed Levell 

Teams: 

Techs: Al Sussman, Jack Wachsberger, Norm Weinstein, Herb 
Weisman, Jerry Oberman, Harold Hall. 

Spares: Ed Levell, Tom Connolly, Ernie Howarth, Dana Binkoff, 
Lou Fayan, Joe Raposa. 

Engineers: Fran Nasser, Paul St. Laurent, Bill O'Neil, Manny 
Vivieros, Ed Larchevesque, Roger Bridge. 

Sauerstoffs: Hank Ziemba, John Keenan, Paul Terry, Bob LeBrun, 
Dick Barber, Jim Curtis. 

Things: Jerry Schnabel, Menelaos Yankopoulos, Hal Isserlis, Sy 
Wexler, Archie Soares, Jack Steinberg. 

Pigeons: Bob Gauthier, Ernie Vigeant, Murray Cohen, Joe Mc- 
Kenna, Bob Madowsky, Ed Cowell. 

Whims: Carolyn Brownell, Marie Hurley, Eleanor McNally, Joan 
Walsh, Jane Malinowski, Shirley Sullivan. 

Mongrels: Ev Arnold, Ed Lavagnino, Grover Boothman, Omer 
Bergeron, Archie Franco, Glenn Gellis. 







Under the direction of Coach Eugene Williams, the Fencing Team in its 
second year at B. D.T.I, has continued the fine spirit of its initial year. The 
antics in the Salle d'Armes on the third floor of the Y.M.C.A. have been a 
source of enjoyment and recreation both to those students who came out for 
the team and to the kibitzers who merely watched. 

The Seniors, — Jack Moss, Mike Spahi, and Carmen Rendino — were a 
great help in the organization and development of the team, and were always 
ready to encourage the others. 

This year two captains were elected — a senior. Jack Moss, and a sopho- 
more, John Murray III. Harold Isserlis was elected manager. The highlights 
of the year were our matches with the varsity teams from Clark University, and 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Harvard freshman team. 
Team line-up: 



Foil 

Edward Hancock 
C. Charles Rendino 
Harold Isserlis 
Chuck O'Koye 



Epee 

Jack Steinberg 
Joe Raposa 
Mike Spahi 



Sabre 

John Murray III 
Jack Moss 
Joe Murphy 
Barney Poritz 



*.. ;• 














IlilipiiiiiiiSffilpiiiMB^^^i^ 




\ 

Tech's 1950 Soccer squad had a very poor season with only 1 
victory, 2 ties and 7 defeats. Due to the lack of replacements, the 
players were hard pressed in most games. This was especially 
noticeable in the out-of-town games. Capt. Henry Nobrega, Jim 
Curtis, Mario Antonelli and Harold Peterson were the only players 
returning from last year's squad. 

Although they lost many games, the team remained a fighting 
one; and next year's team, as a result, will be more experienced. 

Captain: Henry Nobrega 

Players: Harold Peterson, Alex Smith, Chris Spiliotis, Ted Williamson, 
Jack Stavroutis, Alan Sussman, Archie Franco, Luis Kawas, Mohd 
Wasim, Aung Kin, Walter Rak, Bob Kenyon, James Curtis, Neil Mur- 
phy, Paul Parente, William Jackson, Shlomo Rosenbaum, Mario 
Antonelli. 

Manager: Leonard Campbell 

Coach: Robert Bannister 





r &&*&& m 



4j^u^ n 4* 



1 



r^cn 



* 



ECH 





L^t^' 



i\ 



Durfee Tech's 1950 Baseball Team, playing under its 
new Coach Bob Bannister, managed to win three of its 
seven games. The record, although not an impressive 
one, was somewhat better than the previous year; and 
with many varsity players returning, and many baseball 
aspirants in the school, Tech is hoping for a banner year 
in 1951. 





r * 



*>#•' 



The Delta Chapter of Phi Psi Fraternity here at Tech has been pro- 
ducing men who have carried a spirit of brotherhood and good feeling 
into the textile industry since 1909. Phi Psi strives to give its members a 
well-rounded social life here at Tech and also sponsors many educa- 
tional exhibits and conventions. 

To the men of the Class of '51 who go on to take their places in in- 
dustry alongside the brothers of years gone by — good luck and success. 

OFFICERS 



President — Lynwood Gibson 
Vice-President — Ernest Howarth 
Secretary — Alfred Slowe 
Treasurer — Omer Bergeron 



Sr. Warden — Louis Fayan 
Jr. Warden — Theodore Williamson 
Sr. Past President — Robert Staples 
Faculty Advisor — 

Mr. William Wingate 






ttfililfiiii 



1 




Epsilon Phi Pi Fraternity was born here at Tech in April, 1948. Our 
Alpha Chapter has been instrumental in establishing a Beta Chapter at 
Philadelphia Textile Institute. 

Epsilon Phi Pi attempts to stimulate amicable relations between men 
of different national, religious and social backgrounds. Epsilon is mili- 
tantly anti-prejudice. Its powerful ideals will help secure the sucess of its 
brothers entering industry. Good luck. 

OFFICERS 



Chancellor— Morris Cohen 
Vice-Chancellor — William F. Moran 
Secretary — Robert J. LeBrun 
Treasurer — Robert A. Gauthier 



Pledge-Master — 

Cornelius I. Murphy, Jr. 
Corresponding Scribe — Earl Bilsky 
Historian — Gerald G. Schnabel 



Faculty Advisor — Dr. D. Alexander Severino 




On May 30, 1950, the Gamma Chapter of the Kappa Sigma Phi sorority was formally 
installed by Miss Doris McAllister of the Alpha Chapter, Kappa Sigma Phi, of Philadelphia 
Textile Institute. Eight charter members and Mrs. Rudolph La Vault, advisor to the Gamma 
Chapter, were present. 

The sorority strives to advance the cause of women studying and graduating from 
colleges where the study of textiles is a major course. The members attend educational lec- 
tures and meetings and sponsor social activities. 

This June, with the graduation of Miss Marie Hurley, the Gamma Chapter gained its first 
alumna. 



OFFICERS 
President — Anne C. Doherty Secretary — Patricia Cooper 

Vice-President — Myrbeth Weldon Treasurer — Ruth Jean Loub 

Officer of Discipline — Marie Hurley 












The Tech Engineering Society's aims include the promotion of the art and 
science of engineering, the fostering of engineering education, the encourage- 
ment of the sharing of experience among engineers, the advancement of 
original research, and the broadening of the usefulness of the engineering 
profession. 

This ambitious program was implemented in 1951 under the able direction 
of President Leo Langfield by a series of educational meetings, movies, and 
lectures. 



OFFICERS 

President — Leo J. Langfield 
Vice-President — Frank J. Civilikas 
Secretary-Treasurer — James Marchand 








In the Fall of 1946 a group of foreign students in cooperation with some 
of their American classmates formed the Cosmopolitan Club. In keeping with 
its name, the club has fought national and racial prejudice and fostered good 
will among students of various national backgrounds. Through lectures given 
by various members of the club and through meetings with the international 
relations clubs of other colleges, the "Cosmos" has steadily approached its 
goals. 

This year the club boasted members from Burma, Egypt, France, Greece, 
Honduras, Nigeria, Pakistan and Palestine. In the recent past, members have 
come from China, Finland, Peru, Puerto Rico and Turkey. 

One of the most popular activities of the club has been its frequent trips 
to restaurants featuring the national dishes of the countries represented by 
the members. 

OFFICERS 



President — Criton D. Spiliotis, Greece 
Vice-President — 

Henry Ziemba, United States 
Treasurer — Aung Kin, Burma 



Secretary — Monir T. Spahi, Egypt 
Faculty Advisor — Mr. Louis Simeone 
Honorary Member — Mr. Walter Cass 



ROSTER 



Harry Martin (United States) 
Chukwuemeka O'Koye (Nigeria) 
Harold Peterson (United States) 
Luis Kawas (Honduras) 
C. Charles Rendino (United States) 
Mohammed Wasim (Pakistan) 
John Keenan (United States) 



Shlomo Rosenbaum (Israel) 
Thomas Minardi (United States) 
Jack Stavroudis (Greece) 
Cornelius Murphy, Jr. (United States) 
Philip Bernheim (France) 
Gerald Schnabel (United States) 




siv&m 













Our student chapter of the American Association of Textile Chem- 
ists successfully serves its members year after year by offering them 
literature on the latest developments in textile chemistry, by offering an 
employment service through free listings in its publications, and by 
fostering professional meetings, lectures and conventions. The student 
members feel that they have received a great deal of practical infor- 
mation not obtainable through the usual channels of formal education. 
They had a good time in the process. 



OFFICERS 

Chairman — John Keenan 
Secretary — Americo B. Almeida 
Treasurer — Ralph W. Burbank 
Faculty Advisor — Mr. William Wingate 





4 






Through sponsoring many educational meetings and lectures, our 
Student Affiliate Chapter of the American Chemical Society afforded 
an opportunity for students of chemistry to secure the intellectual 
stimulation that arises from professional association. 

The students also secured valuable experience in the preparation 
and presentation of technical papers before chemical audiences. 

The chemistry students feel that the ACS fosters a professional 
spirit among its members. 



OFFICERS 

Chairman — Stanley V. Dubiel, Jr. 
Vice-Chairman — Paul H. Terry 
Secretary-Treasurer — Ruth A. Rockcliffe 
Faculty Advisor — Dr. James Watters 




Hi 




In the four years that have gone by since its inception, the Varsity 
Club has grown from a small group of athletes to a prominent organi- 
zation numbering more than thirty active members. 

The primary purpose of this club is to establish a means of award- 
ing letters to gualifying team participants and to encourage sports at 
Tech. In order to become eligible for a Tech "T" a student must 
play in a specified number of games in any of the major sports. A 
student may also earn a letter by becoming manager in any of these 
sports. 

This year the Varsity Club held its annual Thanksgiving Day 
raffle and also played a major part in the combined Athletic Associa- 
tion and Injured Players Fund raffle. 

The club's officers this year were: 

President — -Harold J. Peterson 
Vice-President — Dana Binkoff 
Secretary-Treasurer — Art Ryan 
Faculty Advisor — Mr. William Wingate 










cr^ _ 







— Editorial Staff — 

Editor-in-Chief Harry B. Martin 

Assistant Editor Richard Barber 

Business Manager Herby Weisman 

Circulation Manager Criton D. Spiliotis 

Sports Editor Robert Kenyon 

Alumni Editor Robert Madowsky 

Editorial Associates 
Alex Smith, Al Slowe, Jack Wachsberger, Shirley Sullivan, Herby 
Weisman, Jane Malinowski, Paul Terry, Daniel Lima, Stanley Dubiel, 
Mike Spahi, Neil Murphy, Ruth Loub, Nancy MacDonald, Harold 
Peterson, Archie Franco, Francis Nasser, Paul St. Laurent, William 
O'Neil, Louis Fayan, John Murray III. 

Circulation Assistants 
Henry Yatsko Carolyn Brownell Barney Nosegay 

Business Assistants 
Alan Sussman Eleanor McNally Norman Reis 

Special Effects 

Glenn Gellis Arty Soares 

Photography 

John Silvia Lynwood Gibson 

Faculty Financial Advisor 

Professor Rudolph La Vault 

Faculty Literary Advisor 

Mr. Walter Cass 

Alumni Association News 

Mr. Robert Cooper Mr. Walter Marston 

Faculty News 

Dr. Alexander Severino 





In the past three years the Athletic Association has provided a good 
athletic program for Tech students. The Association sponsored the major sports 
of Soccer, Basketball and Baseball. These teams took road trips to play in 
Connecticut, Pennsylvania and New York. Robert Bannister, a Tech graduate 
and teacher at Case High School, was appointed head coach. Many other 
athletic activities such as Fencing, Tennis and Bowling were encouraged by 
the association. The Distaff, partially financed by the Athletic Association, 
gave excellent news coverage to all the athletic events. 



OFFICERS 



President — Alexander Smith 
Vice-President — Everett Arnold 
Secretary — Joseph Murphy 
Representative- At-Large — Cornelius Murphy 
Faculty Advisor — Mr. William Wingate 
Financial Advisor — Mr. Albert Stewart 













m 







7; 









**s$fisa 










I£re m » T» »'r>»wm<.' ra ^ fm W * LMMttMiag> 



fptfe 







9hE5«s,M«H 
lx&u7*ii:.fUr| 






mfm 








i 







itt 4fie#tdiay> nte money 
UMAelty. " 




y h' 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Established 1892 

Publishers of Fine Yearbooks 




Quality Craftsmanship 



Dependable Facilities 



THE MARK OF INDIVIDUALITY IS A YEARBOOK 



By 



T. O'TOOLE & SONS, INC 



31 JEFFERSON STREET • STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT 



STAMFORD TEL.4-9226 



NEW YORK. TEL.MELROSE 54112 



ONE OF THE YOUNGEST OLD COMPANIES! 

The modern dyestuff industry was born in 1856 when Perkin discovered 
accidentally that the oxidation of aniline yielded a beautiful violet color. 
Within three years of that revolutionary event began the successful career 
of Geigy as dyestuff makers. 

Since 1859 Geigy has been a constant, important contributor to the science, 
technology and manufacture of synthetic organic chemicals. Many important 
developments have come from Geigy Research, among which have been DDT 
Insecticides, Mitin Mothproofer, the Solophenyl and Cuprophenyl Colors, 
Erio Chrome and Polar Colors, and the first powdered colors for acetate yarns 
— the Cetacyl Direct Colors. In addition, many highly effective processes and 
outstanding mill auxiliary products have been developed. 

This vast store of experience and knowledge is immediately available for every 
new problem that confronts the user of dyestuffs and auxiliaries. Geigy quality 
products and thorough service will help you to succeed in the job for which 
you have been so ably trained. 



<# 



Established 1764 
Dyestuff Makers Since 1859 

Orginators of DDT Insecticides 
and MITIN, the Durable Mothproofer 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



A FRIEND 



VENANGO'S 



Tandem Hook-up 




Most Modern Design in Dyeing Machines 



SUPREME 
VERSATILITY 



for dyeing 5 /* -\ 5 /& -V/t perforated tubes, 
spring packages, barber coleman cheeses, 
rayon cakes, all types of rawstock and 
skein yarn. 



* This photograph shows the Venango Tandem Hook-up . . . 1500 pounds of barber coleman cheeses 
are dyed in two standard 500-pound machines. This Dual Hook-up saves on equipment, dyestuffs and 
chemicals; it increases dyeing and warping production. 



PACKAGE EXTRACTING AND DRYING MACHINES, SAMPLE LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 



VEnanGo 



G 6 LYCOminG STREETS 



SOUTHERN REPRESENTATIVE 
SLAUGHTER MACHINERY CO. 
5I3TRYON ST., CHARLOTTE, N.C. 




EnGinEERinG 



PHILADELPHIA. PEnilfl. 24 



CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 
HUOH WILLIAMS COMPANY 
TORONTO I, ONT., CANADA 



check your 
textile chemical 
needs with 
Warwick's important 
series of ( 

chemical specialties l 
for the 
textile industry 




Warwick technical 
advisors, with 
their wide 
knowledge of 
textile chemicals 
and processes, 
are available for 
consultation. 



WARWICK 



CHEMICAL 
COMPANY 



ANTILUSTROLE* du ii.r. 



APPRAMINE* cationic softeners 



APPRETOLE* anionic soften 



ers 



EUMERCiIIN mercerizing assistants 



FORMASET* textile resins 



IMPREGNOLE # and NORANE* water repellents 



LAIN wJ_<Jbj tar and grease removers 



OlvLr/VlN UjUL coatings for textiles and paper 



iLAo 1 lowJL< for coating and molding 



SETOLE* textile r 



esins 



SULFANOLE synthetic detergents 



WARCOFIX* color fixatives 



WARCO GFI* gas fading inhibitor 



WARCOLENE* finishing oils 



WARCONYL* fire retardants 



WARLUoAIN wetting and rewetting agents 



WARCOSOL # penetrants 



WEAVE-LOK*non.s.ip finish 



SUNTONE* 

pigment printing colors for textiles and plastics 



WARWICK CHEMICAL COMPANY, DIVISION 




10th STREET and 44th AVENUE, LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK 



RCO. U. •. PAT. OFF. 



Compliments of 



ABBOTT MACHINE COMPANY 



WILTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Textile Winding Equipment 



74 




PAROLITE® 

A dust-free, white crystalline reduc- 
ing agent. Soluble, colorless, excel- 
lent for stripping wool rags, shoddy, 
acetate or Nylon fabric. 



CASTROLITE® 

A highly sulphonated castor oil used 
as a staple penetrant for dyeing or 
bleaching in leading textile mills. 



DRYTEX® 

A high-test wax emulsion type water 
repellent finish having extreme sta- 
bility both in the barrel and in di- 
luted form as used. Non-foaming. 



NEOZYME© 

Concentrated low temperature de- 
sizing enzyme. Removes starch and 
gelatine. Excellent for eliminating 
thickeners from printed goods at 
low temperature. 



ZIPOLITE© 

Very efficient detergent with high 
wetting power. Effective in neutral, 
acid or alkaline bath. Dyeing assist* 
ant having good dispersing and 
leveling properties. 



DISPERSALL 

Effective retardent for dyeing vat 
colors. Dispersing and leveling qual- 
ities, useful in wool and acetate 
dyeing. Valuable auxiliary in strip- 
ping vat colors, naphthols. 



NEOZYME©HT 

Concentrated high temperature de- 
sizing enzyme. Removes both starch 
and gelatine. Suitable for continu- 
ous pad-steam method. Remarkable 
stability at very high temperatures. 



VELVORAY® 

A blend of vegetable oils and spe- 
cially selected fats for a superior, 
non-foaming, finishing oil. High in 
combined SO3 and stability. Excel- 
lent for sanforizing. 



NEOWET 

Permits effective wetting at all tem- 
peratures—particularly useful with 
enzymatic desizing agents. No re- 
action to soft or hard water. Not 
affected by either acid or alkali 
chemicals. 



^^jr^ v% /r*8«*£ 




75 



As you enter mill life you will do well to learn all about 
Reiner equipment, its mill-proven record of all around excel- 
lence. The Reiner production program covers a wide range 
of machines - all top performers in their field. As your 
responsibilities grow with the years and decisions have 
to be made - remember Reiner for trouble-free, highest 
speed quality production in the fields listed below: 

High Speed Tricot Machines 

Simplex Tricot Machines 

Kayloom Machines 

Raschel Machines 

Full width and sectional Warpers 

Creels off all types 

Auto Heelers 

Full Fashioned Hosiery Machines up to 66 Gauge 

Automatic Bobbin Winding Machines 
(for Quilting and Stitching Machines) 

Automatic Shuttle Embroidery Machines 10 and 15 yards 

Robert Reiner, Inc. 

550-64 Gregory Avenue 
Weehawken, New Jersey 

— 10 Minutes by bus from Times Square — 
— Makers off Quality Textile Machinery since 1903— 



76 



Best Wishes 

to a 

Wonderful Graduating Class 



X X X 



MICHEL'S BRIDAL SALON 



"Formal Gowns of Distinction 



f) 



331 South Main Street Fall River, Mass. 



77 




How long will the colors last? 



You can only guess how long the colors will last when you 

look at a nature-dyed sky. 

But you can't afford to guess how long colors will last — 

when you need man-made dyes, for a manufactured 

product. You want to be sure the colors will last as long as the 

product itself. 

Our research facilities place us in an 
excellent position to help you find 

the right dye and the right method 

of application ... to make the color 

last the lifetime of your product — 

whatever it may be. E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours & Co. (Inc.), Dyestuffs 

Division, Wilmington 98, Delaware. 




78 



Success and Good Luck to Tech's 

Class of '51 



V A V 



FALL RIVER TEXTILE MANUFACTURERS' 

ASSOCIATION 



Compliments of 



EDWARD M. CORBETT, ARCHITECT 

49 Purchase Street 
and 

SAMUEL T. DUBITSKY, ARCHITECT 

41 North Main Street 



79 



^0&mAfamen& of 



S^ 



mevectm 




'tmam 




€Wi A 



nAtm^ 



^&a/c# ^@A€4ntca/ ^wwto&n 



QS^ttrnt/ ' £s$&&ew, *ymw$£4t£€M 



tehedco and southern 



PRODUCE THE 

I rained m the* s 

fEquip^^ les ate 

Lorld's finest) * J 

standardizing o«* e ^ ld . s 

that "Weave the 

Meeds'." f rild En- 



rC^ /^\ 




STEEL HEDDLE MFG. CO. 

2100 W. ALLEGHENY AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA 32, PA. 

Other Offices and Plants: Greenville, S.C. Atlanta, Ga. Greensboro, N.C. Providence, R.I. 

SOUTHERN SHUTTLES 

Paris Plant . . . Greenville, S. C. A Division of STEEL HEDDLE MFG. CO. 

STEEL HEDDLE COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED 

310 St. Hubert Street, Granby, Quebec, Canada 



1-1.-2.0-0 



80 



Best Wishes 
from 




YOUR 1951 ALETHEA PHOTOGRAPHER 

7 North Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 




ze/tKAACte~-* 



PRODUCERS 


OF 


• 




FINE COMBED COTTONS 


FOR 


WEARING APPAREL ■ 






AND HOME FURNISHINGS 


BROADCLOTHS 




BATISTES HANDKERCHIEFS 


DIMITIES 




ORGANDIES MARQUISETTES 


LAWNS 




VOILES DOTTED and PLAIN 




t&mMte^ 



FINE SPINNING ASSOCIATES INC. 

Turks Head Building, Providence, R. I. 40 Worth Street, New York, N. Y. 



81 



PARNOL (Detergent) 
41% active matter 

ORATOL L-48* 

Sulphonated amide 

MONOPOLE OIL* 
Double sulphonated 

SUPERCLEAR* 
For fine printing 



CHEMICAL SPECIALTIES 
For Textile Processing 

LOMAR P W* 

Efficient dispersing agent 

DILEINE and MELEINE 
Antifume agents 

AMPROZYME* 

To convert starch and proteins 

LUPOMIN* 

Cation active softener 



ASK FOR OUR CHEMICALS AND SPECIALTIES CATALOG 

Jacques Wolf & Co. 

Manufacturing Chemists and Importers 



PASSAIC, N.J. 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



Compliments 
of 



Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
of Fall River 



Compliments of 




FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



82 



Compliments of 

RIVEREDGE PRINTERS, 
INC. 

TEXTILE SCREEN PRINTING 

Plant: 

206 GLOBE MILLS AVENUE 
Fall River, Massachusetts Telephone 3-5886 

New York Office: 

1450 BROADWAY 
New York 18, N. Y. Phone BRyant 9-7710 



Compliments 
of the 

FALL RIVER HERALD 
NEWS 



Compliments 
of 



V A V 



MEYER JAFFE 



SUCCESS and BEST WISHES 



Compliments of the 



HOTEL MELLEN 



83 



GOOD LUCK TO THE CLASS OF '51 



Keep in touch with Tech through 



THE DISTAFF 



Student Publication of the Bradford Durfee 
Technical Institute 



S 3fe X 



COLLEGE 
BOOKSTORE 



*k 5 X 



Best Wishes to the 
CLASS OF '51 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



\ 



BRADFORD DURFEE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



Compliments 
of 



INSTITUTE CAFETERIA 



JOHN PERRY, Prop. 



84 



Compliments of 



DELTA CHAPTER 



PHI PSI FRATERNITY 



BRADFORD DURFEE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



LINCOLN PARK 

Dancing every Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 

BOWLING, SKATING, 

FUN ARCADE, 

FASCINATION, 

EVERY NIGHT 

Open 1 P. M. Saturday and Sunday 



TEX-CHEM COMPANY 



TEXTILE, CHEMICALS and SPECIALTIES 



20-21 Waganaw Road 
Fair Lawn, New Jersey 

HAwthorne 7-3344 

Cable Address TEXKEMCO 



Congratulations from 



ALPHA CHAPTER 



EPSILON PHI PI FRATERNITY 



BRADFORD DURFEE TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 



DURFEE ALLEYS, INC. 



340 CENTRAL STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



H. & N. CHEMICAL 
COMPANY 

of Paterson, New Jersey 



EVERON MARKING TUBES 



Bleachproof, scourproof, dyeproof 
on any fiber 



85 



CHINA ROYAL 


Compliments of 


AMERICAN and CHINESE RESTAURANT 






GRANITE BLOCK SPA 


Real Chinese Food 




Foods to Take Out — Air Conditioned 

3 
SPECIAL LUNCH and DINNER - 50? up 


3 South Main Street Fall River, Mass. 


26 North Main Street — Tel. 4-2310 — Fall River, Mass. 


RESTAURANT and COCKTAIL LOUNGE 


DYESTUFFS 
for Textile Dyeing and Printing 


High Point, North Carolina — Granby, Quebec 
Torino, Italy — Mexico, D. F., Mexico 


NOVA CHEMICAL CORPORATION 

147-53 Waverly Place New York 14, N. Y. 

Warehouses in New York, Charlotte, N. C. 

and Greenville, S. C. 

Selling agents for 

METRO DYESTUFF CORPORATION 

Plant: West Warwick, Rhode Island 






€©|L|L©HPS 

INCORPOR AT E D 




394 Frelinghuysen Avenue Newark 5, New Jersey 




Compliments 
of 


Compliments 




of 


H. SCHWARTZ & SONS, INC. 




664 BROADWAY 


CHERRY & WEBB 


Fall River, Mass. 




SUCCESS TO THE GRADUATING CLASS! 


ELL-MAR'S MEN'S SHOP 




Tom Ellison 


MODERN FURNITURE COMPANY 






HOME OF KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES 


SOUTH MAIN STREET ! 
Fall River, Mass. 


54 South Main Street Near Borden • 



86 



PAUL WOLTMAN 



FALL RIVER'S LARGEST EXCLUSIVE MEN'S STORE 



Woltman Block 



City Hall Square 



Compliments 
of 



ADASKIN FURNITURE CO. 



287 SOUTH MAIN STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



Compliments of 

STERO ASSOCIATES 
CORPORATION 



8- 10 BRIDGE STREET 
New York, N. Y. 



Best Wishes to the Graduates of '51 



WALTER C. FRAZE 



9 NORTH MAIN STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



J. M. DARLING, JR. CO. 



GENERAL CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 



878 South Main Street 



Fall River, Mass. 



SMITH'S DRUG STORE 

"THE MEDICINE SHOP" 

EVERY DRUG STORE NEED 

— Opp. Public Library — 
105 North Main Street Fall River, Mass. 



Congratulations to the 



CLASS OF '51 



A FRIEND 



Compliments of 

MADE RITE POTATO CHIP CO., 
INC. 



1853-57 SOUTH MAIN STREET 
Fall River, Mass. Tel. 2-2407 



87 



I. F. MORIN FURNITURE STORE 



N. Giard, Prop. 



COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



46 Main Road, near State Line North Tiverton, R. I. 

Tel. North Tiverton 2-4869 



MacKENZIE & WINSLOW INC. 

Est. 1882 

LUMBER - GRAIN 

698 RODMAN STREET 744 DAVOL STREET 

Tel. 6-8563 



Compliments of 



COOK BORDEN CO., INC. 



650 DAVOL STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



Good Luck from 



DURO FINISHING CORP. 



110 CHASE STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



PIRES HARDWARE 



1556-1558 NORTH MAIN STREET 
Fall River, Mass. Dial 2-7011 



MONGEAU SHOE STORE, INC. 



KNOWN FOR BETTER SHOES 



236 South Main Street Fall River, Mass. 

Tel. 6-8161 



Compliments of 



NEW YORK TELEVISION CORP. 



1501 PLEASANT STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



BESSE-RUSSELL'S 



MEN'S and BOYS' CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS 



221-223 SOUTH MAIN STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 



88 



Compliments of 

BIRTWELL STAFFORD 

MADISON F. WELSH 

GEORGE E. KAY 


F. H. KINGSLEY 

BUILDING MATERIALS - MILL SUPPLIES 

687 DAVOL STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 


Compliments 
of 

SHORE'S MARKET 


SOMERSET BOAT CO. 

BOAT BUILDING - STORAGE - REPAIRS 
CHARTER BOATS 

34 Riverside Avenue Somerset, Mass. 
Phone FR. 3-4221 


Compliments of 

O'NEIL'S FISK TIRE SERVICE INC. 

COR. DURFEE and CENTRAL STREET 
Fall River, Mass. 


D & D SALES & SERVICE INC. 

FRIGIDAIRE DEALERS 

Louis B. Devine Arthur J. Doucet 
President Treasurer 

363 Second Street Phone 8-5644 


JONES, GARDNER & BEAL, INC. 

P. O. BOX 1463 
Providence, Rhode Island 


Compliments of 

(ELBE) 

Since 1909 

ELBE FILE & BINDER CO., INC. 

MAKERS OF LOOSE-LEAF BINDERS and SUPPLIES 
Fall River, Mass. 



89 



A FRIEND 



W/* 



Compliments of 



MASON'S FURNITURE 



410 PLYMOUTH AVENUE 
Fall River, Mass. 



BEST WISHES TO TECH'S GRADUATES! 



PETROSSO BARBER SHOP 



WEBCO BUILDING 



Armand Petrosso, Prop. 
272 Central Street 



Fall River 



PvcobS 




THE BULLARD CLARK COMPANY 

E. H. Jacobs Northern Division, Danielson, Connecticut 
E. H. Jacobs Southern Division, Charlotte, North Carolina 

WEAVING LOOM NECESSITIES 



Compliments 
of 



R. A. WILCOX CO 



120 BEDFORD STREET 



GOOD LUCK TO TECH'S CLASS OF '51 

MALINOWSKI MARKET 

MEATS, GROCERIES and PROVISIONS 

421 East Main Street Fall River, Mass. 

Tel. 8-5962 



Compliments 
of 

A FRIEND 



Congratulations 
from 



DURFEE TECH'S AD HUNTERS 



90 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 



Attleboro 



Massachusetts 



"Known wherever there are Schools and Colleges" 

Class Rings and Pins 
Commencement Invitations — Diplomas 

Personal Cards 
Club Insignia - Medals and Trophies 

Represented by 

TOM GALVIN 

Attleboro Office 



DIRECTORY LISTINGS 



ANDERSON-LITTLE CO., INC. 

847 Pleasant Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

BUILDING MATERIALS INC. 

Front Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

BUTLER'S SERVICE STATION 
1119 County Street 
Somerset, Mass. 

COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

DUMONT JEWELERS 
1422 Pleasant Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



EMPIRE MEN'S SHOP 
168 South Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

GELL MOTOR SALES, INC. 
514 County Street 
Somerset Center, Mass. 

GOOD LUCK FROM A FRIEND 
JUST A FRIEND 

S. S. KRESGE CO. 
71 South Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

PLOURDE'S BAKERY INC. 
97 North Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

SILKSON'S 

347 South Main Street 
Fall River, Mass. 

L. PAUL THEBERGE 
113 Smithies Street 
Fall River, Mass. 



91 



FOR UNBROKEN CONTINUITY 
OF SERVICE - - 



JOHNSON WARP SIZERS 

are known and used by efficient mills throughout 

the world. 

They're good for long years of continuous, 
trouble-free sizing of delicate warps, with 
few broken ends and an absolute minimum 
of mechanical adjustments or parts re- 
placements. 

THE ULTIMATE IN SIZER DESIGN 

PIERCY and HOLSMAN STREETS 
PATERSON NEW JERSEY 



92 



■ U;